Part 4 Project 2 Stage 2, Analyse 3 Pieces of Work

Work number 1

Spreckley, Project Façade

by Paddy Hartley

Contemporary Textiles, the fabric of fine art. (2008). London: Black Dog publishing, pp.160-70.

Hartley, P. (2007). Spreckley, Project Facade. [image] Available at: http://paddyhartley.com/spreckley [Accessed 2 Apr. 2016].

Paddy Hartley. (2016). Project Facade. [online] Available at: http://paddyhartley.com/project-facade-1 [Accessed 2 Apr. 2016].

Work number 2

The Agony in the Car park

Grayson Perry

Perry, G. (2013). The Agony in the car Park. [image] Available at: http://graysonperrytr.com/the-agony-in-the-car-park/ [Accessed 3 Apr. 2016].

Graysonperrytr.com. (2016). Grayson Perry Virtual Tour – Welcome. [online] Available at: http://graysonperrytr.com/en/ [Accessed 3 Apr. 2016].

Grossechina.com. (2016). GROSSE – About us. [online] Available at: http://www.grossechina.com/index.php/about-grosse-en [Accessed 3 Apr. 2016].

The National Gallery, London, (n.d.). The Agony in the Garden by Giovanni Bellini 1465. [image] Available at: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/giovanni-bellini-the-agony-in-the-garden [Accessed 3 Apr. 2016].

 

Work number 3

Transnatural

Lucy McRae

TED, (2012). Becoming Transnatural. [image] Available at: http://blog.ted.com/inside-out-fellows-friday-with-lucy-mcrae/ [Accessed 3 Apr. 2016].

Lucymcrae.net. (2011). Lucy McRae » Projects. [online] Available at: http://www.lucymcrae.net/home/ [Accessed 3 Apr. 2016].

radiotherapy-moulds. (2014). U.K: Cancer Research UK.

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Part 4 Project 2, Stage 1 Six Artists and Designers.

The 6 artists I chose for this exercise were:

Janet Cooper

race, N. (2003). http://www.JanetCooperDesigns.com. [online] Janetcooperdesigns.com. Available at: http://janetcooperdesigns.com/RPtheArtfulMind.shtml [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Devall, E. (2015). [image] Available at: https://www.facebook.com/Fragments.by.EllenDevall/photos/pb.588890931211010.-2207520000.1458647709./595453397221430/?type=3&theater [Accessed 22 Mar. 2016].

Cooper, j. (2007). party dress Rome. [image] Available at: http://janetcooperdesigns.com/news168.html [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Cooper, j. (2013). various sculptures, Stitched on second hand clothes. [image] Available at: http://janetcooperdesigns.com/stitch.html [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

An eclectic Art, (2006). [image] Available at: http://www.art-e-zine.co.uk/janet.html [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Cooper, j. (2014). Cloth warriors. [image] Available at: http://janetcooperdesigns.com/index.html [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Cooper, j. (2011). painted and Stitched Objects. [image] Available at: http://janetcooperdesigns.com/paintedObjects.html#paint [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Narte, F. (2010). ARTISTICALLY SPEAKING–JANET COOPER DESIGNS. [Blog] Fannie Narte. Available at: http://fanniecarte.blogspot.co.uk/2010/04/artistically-speaking-janet-cooper.html [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Contemporary textiles, The fabric of fine art. (2008). London: Black Dog publishing Ltd., pp.134,135.

Gunta Stolzl

https://uk.pinterest.com/dawnwithpencil/gunta-stolzl/

http://www.guntastolzl.org/

Guntastolzl.org. (2016). Biography – Gunta Stölzl. [online] Available at: http://www.guntastolzl.org/About/Biography/ [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Gunta Stolzl. (n.d.). 1st ed. [ebook] On-line: Bauhouse Online, pp.1, 2. Available at: http://bauhaus-online.de/en/pdf/atlas/personen/bauhaus-online_gunta-stoelzl.pdf [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

V & A Search and collections. (2016). 1st ed. [ebook] London: V & A, p.1. Available at: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O69603/design-for-a-stolzl-gunta/ [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Wall Hanging. (n.d.). [Textile work] V & A, Twentieth Century, room 74, case CA8, box 1. London.

Wortmann Weltge, s. (1993). Bauhaus texiles, Women artists and the weaving workshop. London: Thames and Hudson, pp.10, 12, 41, 44, 53, 55, 59, 60, 166, 182, 189, 191, 192, 46-49, 58, 64, 61, 90, 93, 95-96, 117, 120-22, 58, 63, 96, 104-5, 100, 101-101, 106, 7, 41, 46, 97, 111, 116, 187, 18, 20, 21, 23, 25, 37, 69, 70, 71, 74, 83, 86, 158.

Wortmann Weltge, s. (1993). Bauhaus texiles, Women artists and the weaving workshop. London: Thames and Hudson, p19

Non noted. (2000). [photograph] The Met Breuer 945 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10021, Archives. New York.

TextileArtist.org. (2013). History of textile art: Gunta Stölzl (1897-1983) – TextileArtist.org. [online] Available at: http://www.textileartist.org/textile-artist-gunta-stolzl-1897-1983/ [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Cornelia Parker

https://uk.pinterest.com/dawnwithpencil/cornelia-parker/

Video footage of Cornelia Parker.

Bloomburg Business, (2015). Brilliant ideas – Sculptor and Artist. [image] Available at: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos/2015-05-22/brilliant-ideas-sculptor-and-artist-cornelia-parker [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

https://vimeo.com/154412185

Pinterest. (2016). Cornelia Parker. [online] Available at: https://uk.pinterest.com/dawnwithpencil/cornelia-parker/ [Accessed 3 Apr. 2016].

Adams, T. (2015). Cornelia Parker: ‘I don’t want to tick anyone else’s boxes’. The Guardian. [online] Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/jan/25/cornelia-parker-interview-i-dont-want-to-tick-anyone-elses-boxes-whitworth-retrospective [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Blazwick, I., Ono, Y., Ferguson, B. and Parker, C. (n.d.). Cornelia Parker.

Bloomburg Business, (2015). Brilliant ideas – Sculptor and Artist. [image] Available at: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos/2015-05-22/brilliant-ideas-sculptor-and-artist-cornelia-parker [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

VERDIER, A. (2010). Cornelia Parker, ‘Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View’ 1991. [online] Tate. Available at: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/cornelia-parker-2358 [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Waters, L. (2011). INTERVIEW WITH CORNELIA PARKER. The White Review. [online] Available at: http://www.thewhitereview.org/art/interview-with-cornelia-parker/ [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Howie, S. (2016). Cornelia Parker artist | Alan Cristea Gallery, London – Cornelia Parker. [online] Alancristea.com. Available at: http://www.alancristea.com/artist-cornelia-parker [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Alan Cristea Gallery, (2015). Artist Cornelia Parker talks to Jonathan Watkins. [image] Available at: https://vimeo.com/154412185 [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

INGLEBY GALLERY, (2016). Hot Poker. [image] Available at: http://www.inglebygallery.com/exhibitions/cornelia-parker/ [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Grayson Perry

https://uk.pinterest.com/dawnwithpencil/grayson-perry/

Grayson Perry – Education pack FINAL (1)

Channel 4, (2016). Grayson Perry – Who are you?. [image] Available at: http://www.channel4.com/programmes/grayson-perry-who-are-you [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Royalacademy.org.uk. (2016). Grayson Perry | Artist | Royal Academy of Arts. [online] Available at: https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/artist/grayson-perry-ra [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Liverpool Echo Newspaper, (2014). Grayson Perry promoting his exhibition of tapestries at the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool. [image] Available at: http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/whats-on/arts-culture-news/grayson-perry-tapestry-liverpool-lightnight-7089533 [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Walker Art gallery, Liverpool., (2012). Grayson Perry, ‘The Adoration of the Cage Fighters’, 2012 (detail). [image] Available at: http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/walker/exhibitions/grayson-perry/ [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Art Fund, (2016). Grayson Perry: The Vanity of Small Differences. [image] Available at: http://www.artfund.org/what-to-see/exhibitions/2016/01/09/grayson-perry-the-vanity-of-small-differences-exhibition [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Perry, G. (2013). The vanity of Small Diffferences. london: Hayward Publishing, p.73.

Grayson Perry educational pack. (2012). 1st ed. [ebook] London: The arts Council, pp.5-7. Available at: http://www.artscouncilcollection.org.uk/learning-research/vanity-small-differences-grayson-perry [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Amy de Klerk, A. (2016). Who’s who – Grayson Perry. vogue. [online] Available at: http://www.vogue.co.uk/spy/biographies/grayson-perry-biography [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Grayson Perry Who are you?, (2014). [TV programme] channel 4: Channel 4.

Hattenstone, S. (2016). Grayson Perry: ‘Just because you don’t have a dress on doesn’t stop you being a tranny’. The Guardian. [online] Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/oct/04/grayson-perry-dress-tranny-art-who-are-you-tv [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

 

Paddy Hartley

https://uk.pinterest.com/dawnwithpencil/paddy-hartley/

https://youtu.be/4dJSwzpKZSg

Hartley, P. (2008). Project Facade. [online] Paddy Hartley. Available at: http://paddyhartley.com/project-facade-1 [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Saachi gallery, (2015). lambs heart tissue – print. [image] Available at: http://paddyhartley.com/the-aligera-series-2/ [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Prain, L. (2014). Strange Material Story telling through textiles. Vancouver: Arsenal Pulp Press, pp.113-115.

Debatty, R. (2007). Interview with Paddy Hartley. [Blog] We make money not art. Available at: http://we-make-money-not-art.com/interview_with_23/ [Accessed 24 Mar. 2016].

Lucy McRae

https://uk.pinterest.com/dawnwithpencil/lucy-mcrae/

https://youtu.be/O4g60zB4Un4

https://vimeo.com/5835028

https://youtu.be/oVh6DFqiArU

In the research I found Suzanne Lee. Whilst she is my 7th Artist I felt her work inspired me enough tag her on to my list. I like the idea of growing fabric. Since my cultivating fabric in a tub with an iron grate taken from the Work house buildings in Sheffield, which developed a type of fungus on and within the water, which in my mind created a living link to my ancestors, I wondered if there was some way of developing the culture that thrived in the bowl and using it in some way?

Lucymcrae.net. (2016). Lucy McRae » BIOGRAPHY. [online] Available at: http://www.lucymcrae.net/about/ [Accessed 25 Mar. 2016].

Sellars, S. (2011). Body Architecture: An Interview with Lucy McRae | Simon Sellars. [online] Simonsellars.com. Available at: http://www.simonsellars.com/interview-lucy-mcrae [Accessed 25 Mar. 2016].

McRae, L. (2016). Lucy McRae » THE FAMILY OF PRICKLY LAMP’S. [online] Lucymcrae.net. Available at: http://www.lucymcrae.net/the-family-of-prickly-lamps/ [Accessed 25 Mar. 2016].

JB, L. (2016). LUCY MCRAE + BART HESS: LUCYANDBART. [Blog] optimist prime. Available at: https://optimistprime.wordpress.com/2008/10/10/lucy-mcrae-bart-hess-lucyandbart/ [Accessed 25 Mar. 2016].

Exploded view part 2. (2008). [Blog] LUCYANDBART. Available at: http://www.lucyandbart.blogspot.co.uk/#!http://lucyandbart.blogspot.com/2008/03/exploded-view-part-two.html [Accessed 25 Mar. 2016].

Quinn, B. (2013). Textile visionaries -Innovation and Sustainability in Textile design. London: Laurence King, pp.11, 60-7.

Lee, S. (2012). Biocouture Designer Suzanne Lee on growing your own clothes. [image] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYR2ohaS05U [Accessed 25 Mar. 2016].

Quinn, B. (2013). Textile visionaries – Innovation and Sustainability in Textile Design. London: Laurence King, pp.60-67.

 

Part 4 Project 1 Stage 2 An In-depth Study

Zandra Rhodes

Jacques, A. (2013). Zandra Rhodes: The fashion icon talks embarrassing mums, Freddie Mercury, being punk and going pink. Independant. [online] Available at: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/fashion/features/zandra-rhodes-the-fashion-icon-talks-embarrassing-mums-freddie-mercury-being-punk-and-going-pink-8732694.html [Accessed 31 Mar. 2016].

Alonso, R. and Eisner, L. (2002). STYLE; Rhodes Scholars. The New York Times. [online] Available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2002/06/23/magazine/style-rhodes-scholars.html?pagewanted=all [Accessed 30 Mar. 2016].

Uca.onlineculture.co.uk. (2016). Turning the Pages™ – Zandra Rhodes. [online] Available at: http://uca.onlineculture.co.uk/zandra_rhodes/ [Accessed 31 Mar. 2016].

The Knitted Circle collection, design Z6. (2013). [image] Available at: http://vads.ac.uk/large.php?uid=200214&sos=9 [Accessed 31 Mar. 2016].

Zandra Rhodes Unseen. (2013). 1st ed. [ebook] London: Fashion and Textile Museum. Available at: http://www.ftmlondon.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Zandra-Rhodes-Unseen-release.pdf [Accessed 31 Mar. 2016].

Part 4 Project 1, Stage 1 Research – 10 Artists and Designers.

Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh

We Love Mackintosh. (2016). Margaret MacDonald – Wife of Charles Rennie Mackintosh. [online] Available at: http://www.charlesrenniemac.co.uk/start-here/margaret-mac-donald [Accessed 10 Mar. 2016].

Scotland.org. (2016). Margaret Macdonald. [online] Available at: http://www.scotland.org/features/margaret-macdonald/ [Accessed 10 Mar. 2016].

info@undiscoveredscotland.co.uk, U. (2016). Margaret Macdonald: Biography on Undiscovered Scotland. [online] Undiscoveredscotland.co.uk. Available at: http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usbiography/mac/margaretmacdonald.html [Accessed 10 Mar. 2016].

Scotland, N. (1911). The Mysterious Garden − Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh − m − Artists A-Z − Online Collection − Collection −  National Galleries of Scotland. [online] Nationalgalleries.org. Available at: https://www.nationalgalleries.org/collection/artists-a-z/m/artist/margaret-macdonald-mackintosh/object/the-mysterious-garden-gma-5156 [Accessed 10 Mar. 2016].

info@undiscoveredscotland.co.uk, U. (2016). Margaret Macdonald: Biography on Undiscovered Scotland. [online] Undiscoveredscotland.co.uk. Available at: http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usbiography/mac/margaretmacdonald.html [Accessed 10 Mar. 2016].

Huntsearch.gla.ac.uk. (2016). Hunterian Art Gallery Mackintosh collections: GLAHA 52935. [online] Available at: http://www.huntsearch.gla.ac.uk/cgi-bin/foxweb/huntsearch_Mackintosh/LargeImage.fwx?catno=52935&filename=crm/52935.jpg [Accessed 10 Mar. 2016].

Bienvenue à Glasgow. (2013). Margaret MacDonald Mackintosh – Bienvenue à Glasgow. [online] Available at: http://bienvenueaglasgow.over-blog.com/margaret-macdonald-mackintosh [Accessed 10 Mar. 2016].

Completeimagesofpaintings.tumblr.com. (2016). More Than the Details. [online] Available at: http://completeimagesofpaintings.tumblr.com/page/7 [Accessed 10 Mar. 2016].

Leon Baskt

Vam.ac.uk. (2016). Biography of Léon Bakst – Victoria and Albert Museum. [online] Available at: http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/b/biography-of-leon-bakst/ [Accessed 15 Mar. 2016].

Nga.gov.au. (2016). BALLETS RUSSES: The Art of Costume –. [online] Available at: http://nga.gov.au/exhibition/balletsrusses/Default.cfm?MnuID=4&GALID=19455&viewID=3 [Accessed 15 Mar. 2016].

timswings, (1989). Leon Bakst – Les Ballets Russes – Sheherazade. [image] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJXFTlS52ps&list=PLE2GudTy0GAPNVOWIBMrXZFdMX3l0Lwtt [Accessed 15 Mar. 2016].

Modern Dress, Dione, 1910. (1910). [image] Available at: http://criolloylapeninsula.tumblr.com/post/75248636472/l%C3%A9on-bakst [Accessed 30 Mar. 2016].

 

Ethel Mairet

Google+, (2016). Ethel Mairet (1872-1952) | Alumni and associates: fashion and textiles | Arts and Humanities. [online] Arts.brighton.ac.uk. Available at: http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/faculty-of-arts-brighton/alumni-and-associates/associates-and-alumni/fashion-and-textiles/mairet,-ethel-1872-1952 [Accessed 15 Mar. 2016].

Vads.ac.uk. (2016). Thirteen Weavers – Visual Arts Data Service: the online resource for visual arts. [online] Available at: http://www.vads.ac.uk/learning/learndex.php?theme_id=csctex&theme_record_id=csctexmairet&mtri=csctexfor [Accessed 15 Mar. 2016].

Design Council Archive Ethel Mairet. (2016). [430 linear metres / material still to be boxed] University of Brighton Design Archives, GB 2941 2003.21/2003.23.

halton, r. (2005). Ethel Mairet. TEXTILE the journal of cloth and culture, [online] 3(3), pp.292-317. Available at: https://issuu.com/rachel_h/docs/weaving_ethel_mairet [Accessed 15 Mar. 2016].

Albersfoundation.org. (2016). Josef and Anni Albers Foundation. [online] Available at: http://www.albersfoundation.org/ [Accessed 15 Mar. 2016].

Anni Albers

Weltge-Wortmann, S. (1993). Bauhaus textiles. London: Thames and Hudson.

Albersfoundation.org. (2016). Josef and Anni Albers Foundation. [online] Available at: http://www.albersfoundation.org/ [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

The Museum of Modern Art. (2016). Anni Albers | MoMA. [online] Available at: http://www.moma.org/collection/artists/96 [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

The Museum of Modern Art. (2016). Anni Albers. Design for Smyrna Rug. 1925 | MoMA. [online] Available at: http://www.moma.org/collection/works/3735?locale=en [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Bauhaus-online.de. (2016). Anni Albers (-Fleischmann) | Bauhaus Online. [online] Available at: http://bauhaus-online.de/en/atlas/personen/anni-albers-fleischmann [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

http://www.aaa.si.edu/. (1968). Oral history interview with Anni Albers, 1968 July 5, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. [online] Available at: http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/interviews/oral-history-interview-anni-albers-12134 [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Clarke, S. (2011). Textile Design. London: Lawrence King Publishing Ltd, p.22, 81, 92.

Lucienne Day

Classictextiles.com. (2016). Dandelion Clocks – Classic Textiles. [online] Available at: http://www.classictextiles.com/lucienne-day/dandelion-clocks/index.html [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Robinandluciennedayfoundation.org. (2016). Robin and Lucienne Day Foundation – Lives and Designs. [online] Available at: http://www.robinandluciennedayfoundation.org/lives-and-designs/1930s [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Robinandluciennedayfoundation.org. (2016). Robin and Lucienne Day Foundation – Lives and Designs. [online] Available at: http://www.robinandluciennedayfoundation.org/lives-and-designs/2000s/lucienne-day-br-2000s [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Collections.vam.ac.uk. (2016). Lucienne Day | Name | V&A Search the Collections. [online] Available at: http://collections.vam.ac.uk/name/day-lucienne/2262/ [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Clarke, S. (2011). Textile Design. London: Lawrence King Publishing Ltd, p.29.

Magdelena Abakanowicz

Abakanowicz.art.pl. (2016). Magdalena Abakanowicz. [online] Available at: http://www.abakanowicz.art.pl/ [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Nga.gov. (2016). National Gallery of Art – Sculpture Garden. [online] Available at: https://www.nga.gov/feature/sculpturegarden/sculpture/sculpture4.shtm [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Magdelena Abakanowicz. (1992). 1st ed. [ebook] Wakefield: Oriel Mostyn, pp.1 – 8. Available at: http://file:///C:/Users/Susan%20Burgess/Downloads/ysp-exhibition-guide.pdf [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Polishculture-nyc.org. (2016). Search – Polish Cultural Institute. [online] Available at: http://www.polishculture-nyc.org/?itemcategory=30817&personDetailId=35 [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Jakubowska, A. (2011). Magdalena Abakanowicz’s “Abakans” and the Feminist Revolution, in: Regarding the Popular: High and Low Culture in the Avant-Garde and Modernism, European Avant-Garde and Modernism Studies, vol. 2. 1st ed. [ebook] Berlin: Berlin 2011, pp.p. 253-265. Available at: http://www.academia.edu/7927512/Magdalena_Abakanowiczs_Abakans_and_the_Feminist_Revolution [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Photography & Visual Arts, (n.d.). Magdalena Abakanowicz with her piece “Tłum”. Courtesy of CSW. [image] Available at: http://culture.pl/en/artist/magdalena-abakanowicz [Accessed 4 Apr. 2016].

A-Z Quotes. (2016). TOP 5 QUOTES BY MAGDALENA ABAKANOWICZ | A-Z Quotes. [online] Available at: http://www.azquotes.com/author/24836-Magdalena_Abakanowicz [Accessed 4 Apr. 2016].

Katarsis,. (1985). [image] Available at: http://www.marlboroughgallery.com/galleries/graphics/artists/magdalena-abakanowicz/graphics [Accessed 4 Apr. 2016].

Zandra Rhodes

Zandrarhodes.com. (2016). Biography. [online] Available at: http://www.zandrarhodes.com/about [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Zandrarhodes.ucreative.ac.uk. (2016). Zandra Rhodes Digital Study Collection: WELCOME. [online] Available at: http://www.zandrarhodes.ucreative.ac.uk/p/welcome.html [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Uca.onlineculture.co.uk. (2016). Turning the Pages™ – Zandra Rhodes. [online] Available at: http://uca.onlineculture.co.uk/zandra_rhodes/ [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

The Guardian, (2015). Zandra Rhodes: ‘Any real punk would have had nothing to do with me’. [online] Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/oct/06/zandra-rhodes-art-fashion-designer [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Rhodes, Z. (2009). Zandra Rhodes: A Lifelong Love Affair with Textiles. New York: ACC Art Books; Reprint edition.

Rhodes, Z. (2016). New FreeSpirit fabric designer Zandra Rhodes | Make It Coats. [online] Makeitcoats.com. Available at: http://www.makeitcoats.com/en-gb/discover/designers/zandra-rhodes [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

WGSN Insider magazine (on-line), (2012). Zandra Rhodes 1970’s. [image] Available at: https://www.wgsn.com/blogs/zandra-rhodes-revisits-the-runway-at-paris-fashion-week/ [Accessed 30 Mar. 2016].

Zandrarhodes.ucreative.ac.uk. (2016). Zandra Rhodes Digital Study Collection: DRESSES. [online] Available at: http://www.zandrarhodes.ucreative.ac.uk/p/dresses.html [Accessed 30 Mar. 2016].

Good Reads. (2016). The Female Eunuch Quotes. [online] Available at: https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/94985-the-female-eunuch [Accessed 30 Mar. 2016].

WEINRAUB, J. (1971). Germaine Greer — Opinions That May Shock the Faithful. The New York Journal. [online] Available at: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9E0DE3DA1530E73BBC4A51DFB566838A669EDE [Accessed 30 Mar. 2016].

Judy Chicago

Judychicago.com. (2016). Biography « Judy Chicago. [online] Available at: http://www.judychicago.com/about/biography/ [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Levin, G. (2007). Becoming Judy Chicago. New York: Harmony Books.

Chicago, J. (1979). The complete dinner party. Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor Press/Doubleday.

Lucie-Smith, E. and Chicago, J. (2000). Judy Chicago. New York: Watson-Guptill Publications.

The Art Story. (2016). Judy Chicago Biography, Art, and Analysis of Works. [online] Available at: http://www.theartstory.org/artist-chicago-judy.htm [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Brooklynmuseum.org. (n.d.). Brooklyn Museum: Judy Chicago. [online] Available at: https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/judy-chicago [Accessed 4 Apr. 2016].

Body-pixel.com. (2010). Judy Chicago – When Women Rule the World | body pixel. [online] Available at: http://www.body-pixel.com/2010/07/26/judy-chicago-%E2%80%93-when-women-rule-the-world/ [Accessed 4 Apr. 2016].

The Dinner Party. (2014). [image] Available at: http://www.olivercloke.com/judy-chicago-donates-feminist-art-collection-to-penn-state [Accessed 4 Apr. 2016].

 

Issey Miyake

Mds.isseymiyake.com. (2016). ISSEY MIYAKE Official Site. [online] Available at: http://mds.isseymiyake.com/im/en/work/ [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Vogue UK. (2016). Fashion news daily, catwalk photos, fashion trends and designer looks. [online] Available at: http://www.vogue.co.uk/brand/issey-miyake [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

ISSEY MIYAKE :: (MORE) PLEATS PLEASE. (2013). Drome Magazine. [online] Available at: http://www.dromemagazine.com/issey-miyake-more-pleats-please/ [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Designer 101: Issey Miyake!

 

Tracey Emin

Emin, T. (2016). Emin International – Emin International. [online] Emininternational.myshopify.com. Available at: http://emininternational.myshopify.com/ [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Emin, T. (2016). Biography – Tracey Emin Studio. [online] Traceyeminstudio.com. Available at: http://www.traceyeminstudio.com/biography/ [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

The Guradian, (2014). Tracey Emin: Where does that girl go? Where does that youth go?. [online] Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/sep/28/tracey-emin-interview-rachel-cooke [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Time out, London, (2015). My Bed. [image] Available at: http://now-here-this.timeout.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Screen-shot-2015-03-30-at-11.19.22.png [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

KUNSTHALLE, S. (2012). Intimate with Tracey Emin – My bed 2012. [image] Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kg5ad44knPA [Accessed 16 Mar. 2016].

Gallery, S. (2016). Tracey Emin – My Bed – Contemporary Art. [online] Saatchigallery.com. Available at: http://www.saatchigallery.com/artists/artpages/tracey_emin_my_bed.htm [Accessed 17 Mar. 2016].

Tate. (2016). Tracey Emin, ‘The Perfect Place to Grow’ 2001. [online] Available at: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/emin-the-perfect-place-to-grow-t11791/text-summary [Accessed 17 Mar. 2016].

Emin, T. (1997). Mad Tracey from Margate. Everyone’s been there, 1997. [image] Available at: http://Mad Tracey from Margate. Everyone’s been there, 1997 Mad Tracey from Margate. Everyone’s been there, 1997 [Accessed 4 Apr. 2016].

 

 

Part 3 Stage 5 Translating ideas into samples.

In starting to look at producing samples I wanted to explore further distressing materials and began by burning. I continued the theme from earlier work about my tribe, my ancestors stories from part 1.

I printed out images of my ancestors and also burnt text from a census report giving details of them and began layering. I used as heat gun to apply the heat and in doing so I melted the heat gun. Not what I expected.  I am intrigued by the melting away of text on the silk screen fabric to reveal the underneath layers. I have no knowledge where this may take me and if I am on the right lines with my enquiry, but it is an itch I need to scratch.

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In this sample I have burnt the muslin beneath. It strikes me as looking similar to the rust marks produced by soaking fabric and wrapping around the grate cover.

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Stitching the fabric to paper doesn’t give me a flexible fabric to use, nor does it stimulate any further ideas of how I could use or develop the idea. I wonder if I have taken myself into a cul de sac with the subject as well as the approach?

One sample I did like was the burning of the negative print. It obliterated areas of the print, burning away faces or turning them unrecognisable. I keep being drawn to samples and experiments that act as metaphors. I need to be conscious of this as it may be the thing that is limiting the process of experimentation/exploring.

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I am lost. I have no idea as to what to do next and thoughts of producing samples from what?

I need to produce samples, and I am thinking fabric samples but nothing I have done so far can I see me taking further. I can continue to burn and distress fabric but is that enough, do I need to produce samples towards producing a piece of work? Again I cannot see anything I have done so far  being taken further. I want to produce something that has more of a process to it that simply burning. I could layer the pieces I have but I am not sure that that is enough? I am feeing that I need to do something more involved again back to a process that has more components to it than simply burning and layering.

I have decided to play a little further with something that is abstract to begin with, and has no relation to what I have already been working with,  pianola scroll. I picked it up at a market a few years ago and for some reason it came to mind. It has a pattern on holes along its length which would dictate which hammer was lifted and dropped within the Pianola in order for a tune to be played. It has a kind of musical Morse code. I am hoping that by playing with something that has no relevance to my existing thoughts and which is also not of any definite form may jolt me forward. I have scanned some of its length and I shall recreate its pattern using a variety of materials. Hopefully this will take me to producing samples that will satisfy the OCA brief.

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I puzzled how to attack this. Struggle is becoming synonymous with part 3. So looked for something that light would pass through and I found some flexi plastic and decided to transfer the markings on to it. I did so, and then baked the sheet in the oven to shrink and harden it. I did this to two sections of the pianola sheet. I then suspended the plastic from a dowel and allowed a spot light to shine through it. The reflections from the light plus the shadows it cast onto the white wall were pleasing.

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The link below shows video of the sample installation.

https://youtu.be/kk6-lCwWkxY

 

From this I wanted to see how an image of a face would translate to this medium. I was drawn back to the work fro part 1 and I printed off onto the plastic a photograph of myself and baked it again to harden. I then stood it in front of an image of my Great Grandmother. The photograph of her was printed on to opaque plastic and hardened. I imagined that I could cast a shadow image of myself onto her image, blending the two.

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Above my Ancestor printed onto opaque plastic which was hardened, and below the print of myself. It isn’t as pronounced as the previous print. The two images below are the image with a spot light shining through to cast a shadow on the wall.

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Above the image is slightly clearer by looking at it from the side. The plastic is glossy and therefore creates a lot of refection off its surface which makes it difficult to photograph. I do like the distortion though and find it would be something that I would want to work with given this effect.

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Moving the light to the side, the image is becoming clearer.

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Below the two images with mine casting a shadow on the photograph of my Great Grand Mother. This works not because of the shadow but because of the placing. The two together in life, create an atmospheric installation and I can clearly see how I could use this moving forward. This is the kind of discovery that excites me and gives me impetus to develop the idea further and to also pay with scale. I would like to find a way of reproducing this but having the images life size. Walking through the plates would be quite emotional for me but would the viewer who didn’t know the relationship, have a similar or comparable emotion? I do feel the larger size of it would increase the impact.

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The image above has some foxing on the front plastic. It gives the piece the feeling of looking at your reflection in an antique mirror. The foxing appeared because the gloss and shiny surface of the plastic resisted the inks from  my printer. The ink dried when it was in the oven baking. This would be easy to replicate should I wish to.

I think the main source of my frustration has been my inability to see how I could produce fabric samples. Though at this stage I have had a revelation about what a sample needs to be and I have made my peace with not producing a ‘fabric’ or fabrics with the samples. I feel that my samples for this section are looking at how I can use light not to just produce a 2 dimensional fabric but to explore a 3 dimensional piece of work. The nature of light reflecting or passing through something, already facilitates that you think of some supporting structure, in order for this to happen or at least to record and photograph how the material you use and light play together. I believe this also has knocked my judgement sideways when looking how to produce a sample.

In part 1 I produced many samples of prints onto fabric and using light to play with and through them, and in part this has been a stumbling block, as I feel I have already started the workshops in earlier parts of exploring ideas. This does not mean I think I have explored them thoroughly only that I stumbled with duplicating something I had already been working with, and didn’t feel my time would be best served doing this. I also thought getting to grips with new materials may help me get back into working with textiles.

Whilst I have been fretful in my inability to think and produce two-dimensional fabric samples, I now am at peace with it when I have seen where the stumbles and playing has taken me. I am quite relieved that the struggling through my insecurities and lack of vision has taken me to explore plastics. I had no notion this would happen. I must learn again to trust the process. This way of working has become lost during my time working on the Printing course, as the process there is learning the exacting methods of producing various prints. The reduction lino cutting especially  shaped a new way of working, where I needed to plan several moves in advance and precision was key. I found this drilled my thinking to a small space in which to work which I found restrictive. It also took away the ability to be experimental for me. Returning to textile work and a materials led approach has involved some unlearning of those habits and establishing a trust in working with the process again. I would imagine that this flux in process and methods will continue throughout my time working in textiles.

Given that I was now feeling confident about not producing the samples I initially thought I needed to make, I decided to stitch together the cine film that I used to create the video installation in part 1. I also decided to stitch some negatives I had from photographs of my wedding. I then took photographs of the shadows cast on the wall when light is shone through  them. All that wrangling in my brain to then decide to produce ‘fabrics’. I have just mentioned the flux of methods? I want to insert LOL here but I don’t think it’s appropriate.

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I particularly like the textures the cine film casts juxtaposed by the actual film. The two meld together in a way that creates spectacular interplay of the shadow and film. The shadow is an integral part in the sample. I see the sample being the installation of the two together.

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Above I placed the photograph of my Great Grand Mother behind the film as I wanted to impose the images onto her. Her image isn’t as clear on the above photograph as in life. I do like the ghostly apparition of her it does create.

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At this angle the photograph below is more visible.

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Above and below I replaced the photograph of my Ancestor with my own photograph that I had printed using a sepia colouring to mirror the previous photograph. My image was distorted enough for it not to be obvious behind the negatives. The reflection of the spot light also distorted the image behind. It made the whole thing look quite fluid. I took the spot off the image and just used ambient lighting to see if that would bring the photograph clearer. It did but also lost the movement the illusion the lights reflection gave.

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At the end of this exercise I feel quite relieved at gaining a new level of understanding of myself, though the process. I had to keep pushing through doing the exercises and playing with materials in order to see that I didn’t necessarily need to produce what I deemed to be a sample. The formation of a two-dimensional fabric or material. I see that the samples I needed to make were in fact plastics, cine film and negatives used in a way they were not made for and also how they were formed for me to record them.

Taking this work a step further I wanted to see how I could burn the cine film and negatives. I didn’t want to simply scorch the film randomly I wanted to see if I could make an clear image. I am thinking of part 5 and my own project coming up and thought these samples could play an integral part in what and how I could produce something.

I stitched together the cine film and negatives as per the previous samples and then I printed out some photographs of myself and my Great Grand Mother. I wanted to use the   photographs as  an image to trace over using my soldering iron.I was pleasantly surprised at the result.

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I then began to layer by placing cine film and negatives in front and shining the spot light through in order to see the effects.

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I also cut into the film and negatives, creating a silhouette and used these to project onto the  photographs.

silhouettes

silhouettes

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Again I am unsure where these samples will lead me, but I am sure they will inform how and what I begin to work on for Part 5.

My 3D viewer below.

3d viewer

3d viewer

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I have had this little viewer for many years and whilst I have been looking for some way of finding a structure to support film and plastic recording layering of images. Fumbling around with cardboard that proved unsuccessful and then I tried to use a blank CD case. It worked to a degree but also cast the frame of the CD which was disappointing.

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Where the magic happened. I say that in jest as the scene belies the amount of work that has gone into producing the samples.

 

 

 

 

Part 3 Stage 4 Researching source material.

In reviewing the materials I have created and found and looking back over the recorded experiments, I am led to see similarities in the shadows cast in my studio to effects out in nature. The crochet below left shadows that looked like light playing on water.

length of crochet in a simple shell pattern.

The actual crochet panel above and the resulting shadows below. The effect reminds me of the reflections water makes when light is refracted off it. I am thinking of the ripples on a pond, and in seeing this similarity I am left with a calm feeling when looking at the shadow.

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the pond at Cresswell crags

the pond at Cresswell crags

cressy 1

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The above image is a photograph taken of the inside of a tube of knitted wire. It shows shadows of a spine that runs through the length of the knit. It echoes the interior of the Winter Gardens structure in Sheffield. The photograph of the wire also is quite hypnotic as it draws you in towards its interior. Each material gives the impression of a sturdy, ribbed structure that also has the illusion of great size and strength. If I was to use the hessian I would need to add something to hold the shape, wither boning, wire stitched to form ribs or some clear material that wouldn’t show it’s involvement in keeping the shape in place?

winter gardens Sheffield

winter gardens Sheffield

Looking beneath the length of hessian has the same structural impression.

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Below one of the photographs that I took of lace fabric draped over an empty Cd case reminds me of a clear night sky, with the constellations of start fanning out before me. The photograph below it I got from a stock photo site. I haven’t been able to take a suitable photograph myself unfortunately.

crochet fabric.

crochet fabric lit with a candle

Image result for starry night sky

Above is some netting that surrounds a field near where I live. I was made to remember this when I had completed my large knitting sample.

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The actual knitting above and the shadow it cast on the wall below.

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Whilst I can see a relation to nature or objects in the shadows I have been working with , I cannot see a way to take this forward at all. I am completely stuck. maybe I need to play more in order to find a way forward?

 

 

 

Part 3 Stage 3 Reviewing materials and processes.

The later experiments where I have been burning away fabric to create holes, using text in order to shine light through haven’t given me crisp shadows to work with but the ghostly/ethereal effect shadows are something that I would like to explore further in conjunction with images I have of my Ancestors.

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The more crisp, recognisable text was the result of writing on fabric using pva and shining the light through this. I think this may be the ideal method to layer with opposed to fabric that has the letters burned from it?

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text written in pva onto silk screen fabric

text written in pva onto silk screen fabric

Marrying together samples from my experiments I could easily see how I could work with layering. especially the text overlaying photographs of my Great Grand Mother.

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Above the photograph printed on to fabric has the shadow cast on to it. The shadow comes from text written onto an empty CD case. Below the text has been printed onto muslin and the light shone through. It is hard to see that it is text.

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The 3 images above are taken using the photograph printed onto calico, with light shining through text which has been written on to silk screen fabric using pva. The result isn’t clear at all, even though I used a spot light then a candle to test how the strength of the light affect the intensity of the shadow.

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Above I shone a light through text burnt out of the silk screen fabric.

 

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Above the pva lettering on silk screen fabric is laid over the photograph. The photograph is obscured to much to be effectively shown on the photograph. In life I do quite like this effect.

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The above 2 images show light being shone through text which is produced by burning away the silk screen fabric using a soldering iron. It is a clearer shadow. Below is the photograph shown through the burnt away text.

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The 2 images below show the same burnt away text laid over the rust marked fabric. The fabric was marked after being wrapped around a grate cover from the workhouse that my Great Grand Mother lived in for a period of time. The photographs do not show clearly the effect. I do see this as being my favourite effect of all the experiments so far. I like how we need to peer through the burnt out names to the decay from the workhouse grate cover. It is a good metaphor for that whole period of her life, that your peer her Husbands name to see the damage done by the workhouse. It was because of the death of her Husband that they fell on hard times and ended up living in the workhouse. This is something that I would want to explore further.

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I do feel that I can start to produce some actual samples from the layering I have done here in stage 3.